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Tall 1886 Broadside with Numismatic Content

Currency:USD Category:Coins & Paper Money Start Price:325.00 USD Estimated At:500.00 - 500.00 USD
Tall 1886 Broadside with Numismatic Content
A buyer’s premium of 17.5% will be added to the cost of all lots purchased. See shipping info and full terms.
Thomas, M., & Sons. SECOND SALE OF THE COLLECTION FORMERLY KNOWN AS "LONG'S MUSEUM." CATALOGUE OF REVOLUTIONARY AND REBELLION RELICS... Philadelphia, Jan. 27, 1886. Broadside [69 by 31 cm], printed on one side. 298 lots. Folded in eighths and taped along folds on back and at margins. Very good or so. A rare 19th-century broadside with some numismatic content, including Confederate currency, a 1788 Massachusetts copper, a "Washington and Jackson Silver Proof Medal," and other items (generally minor). The Times of Philadelphia reported on the sale the following day: "SELLING CURIOSITIES. The Remaining Antiques From Long's Museum Sold at Auction. The last remaining relics of Long's Museum, once a famous Southwark institution, were sold at auction yesterday afternoon by M. Thomas & Sons in the art gallery of their establishment on Fourth street. When the curiosities of the museum were sold in November last the bidding was so light that the articles put up went at a great sacrifice and many of the curiosities were held over until yesterday in the hope of making more profitable sales. The crowd that assembled at the auction yesterday afternoon was composed principally of antiquarians and museum agents. Among the bidders were Thomas Donaldson, J.P. Smith, Roman Cattara, A.M. Smith, John Caster, A.C. Brown and Mrs. Low, of Norristown, who owns a large and valuable collection of curiosities. The principal articles sold were relics of the Revolutionary War and the great Rebellion, consisting of old currency, guns, swords, pikes, shells, Union and Confederate flags, old newspapers, pieces of wood and coins. The prices received were very small. A block of wood from the Penn Treaty Tree was sold for fifteen cents; an anchor from the frigate Alliance brought $2.50; a piece of a bell from the man-of-war Merrimac brought thirty cents, and bricks from a chapel at Jamestown, Va., brought twenty-five cents. A section of a cannon on board the Monitor and other naval mementoes brought similar prices. A lot of minerals, books, engravings and magazines and two large dingy old paintings, representing "Danae and the Golden Shower" and "Diana" were knocked down at very low figures."